Ownership of two historic New England lighthouses will be given away
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Ownership of two historic New England lighthouses will be given away

Federal officials are preparing to give away two historic New England Lighthouses, including surrounding land and buildings, after deciding that the beacons are no longer needed by the US Coast Guard.But this isn’t your chance to get some cheap, seaside real estate.The General Services Administration said it will only accept applications for the 166- and 165-year-old Rhode Island lighthouses from certain kinds of organizations. Those include other government agencies, non-profit corporations, educational agencies, and parks or cultural programs to take ownership of the lighthouses.The 45-foot Watch Hill Lighthouse tower was built in 1855 and is a part of the Watch Hill Historic District, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The 4.5-acre property on a peninsula in Westerly also includes an oil house built in 1855-56, a brick signal house from the early 20th century and a workshop built in 1939. Watch Hill Lighthouse is in active use as an aid to navigation. The 64-foot Beavertail Lighthouse tower was built in 1856 and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. The original lighthouse on the property in Jamestown was constructed in 1749 but was burned down by British Solders in 1779. Its 7-acre property also includes six other buildings. Any organizations interested in receiving ownership of the lighthouses is asked to submit a letter of interest to the GSA. Letters must include the name of the requested property, name and contact information of the interested entity and non-profit agencies must provide a copy of their articles of incorporation. Those who are determined to be eligible will receive further application details from the National Park Service and given an opportunity to inspect the property.

Federal officials are preparing to give away two historic New England Lighthouses, including surrounding land and buildings, after deciding that the beacons are no longer needed by the US Coast Guard.

But this isn’t your chance to get some cheap, seaside real estate.

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The General Services Administration said it will only accept applications for the 166- and 165-year-old Rhode Island lighthouses from certain kinds of organizations. Those include other government agencies, non-profit corporations, educational agencies, and parks or cultural programs to take ownership of the lighthouses.

The 45-foot Watch Hill Lighthouse tower was built in 1855 and is a part of the Watch Hill Historic District, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The 4.5-acre property on a peninsula in Westerly also includes an oil house built in 1855-56, a brick signal house from the early 20th century and a workshop built in 1939.

Watch Hill Lighthouse is in active use as an aid to navigation.

The 64-foot Beavertail Lighthouse tower was built in 1856 and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. The original lighthouse on the property in Jamestown was constructed in 1749 but was burned down by British Solders in 1779. Its 7-acre property also includes six other buildings.

Any organizations interested in receiving ownership of the lighthouses is asked to submit a letter of interest to the GSA. Letters must include the name of the requested property, name and contact information of the interested entity and non-profit agencies must provide a copy of their articles of incorporation.

Those who are determined to be eligible will receive further application details from the National Park Service and given an opportunity to inspect the property.

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