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DCR increases lifeguard staffing at Mass. beach due to ‘dangerous rip currents’

The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation is staffing more lifeguards at a state-run beach after what it calls dangerous rip currents swept multiple people out to sea.Salisbury Beach now has lifeguards on duty every day of the week from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. instead of just weekends after two separate water rescues were made recently, and during a time when lifeguards were not on duty.The Salisbury Harbormaster and Salisbury Police Department are also increasing patrols on the beach.”Swim in groups, know your limits and if you’re not a proficient swimmer, keep the water up to your waist and nothing further,” said Salisbury police Lt. Rich Dellaria.Just north of Salisbury Beach, officials say they made three water rescues alone at Hampton Beach, New Hampshire, on Sunday.Rip currents are currents of water flowing away from the shore at beaches. They typically extend from near the shoreline, through the surf zone and past the line of breaking waves. The surf zone is the area between the high tide level on the beach to the seaward side of breaking waves.According to the National Weather Service, swimmers tend to get in trouble when they are moved so far offshore by the current, that they are unable to get back to the beach because of fear, panic, exhaustion or lack of swimming skills.Rip currents can be as narrow as 10 or 20 feet in width though some may be up to 10 times wider. The length of the rip current also varies.Anyone who is caught in a rip current should always swim across the current – parallel to the beach, and not try to swim against the current. “Keep a close eye on children and never let them swim alone,” the DCR said.

The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation is staffing more lifeguards at a state-run beach after what it calls dangerous rip currents swept multiple people out to sea.

Salisbury Beach now has lifeguards on duty every day of the week from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. instead of just weekends after two separate water rescues were made recently, and during a time when lifeguards were not on duty.

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The Salisbury Harbormaster and Salisbury Police Department are also increasing patrols on the beach.

“Swim in groups, know your limits and if you’re not a proficient swimmer, keep the water up to your waist and nothing further,” said Salisbury police Lt. Rich Dellaria.

Just north of Salisbury Beach, officials say they made three water rescues alone at Hampton Beach, New Hampshire, on Sunday.

Rip currents are currents of water flowing away from the shore at beaches. They typically extend from near the shoreline, through the surf zone and past the line of breaking waves. The surf zone is the area between the high tide level on the beach to the seaward side of breaking waves.

According to the National Weather Service, swimmers tend to get in trouble when they are moved so far offshore by the current, that they are unable to get back to the beach because of fear, panic, exhaustion or lack of swimming skills.

this rip current sign is posted at most beaches across massachusetts, and shows what swimmers should do in the event they are caught in a rip current.

NOAA

This rip current sign is posted at most beaches across Massachusetts, and shows what swimmers should do in the event they are caught in a rip current.

Rip currents can be as narrow as 10 or 20 feet in width though some may be up to 10 times wider. The length of the rip current also varies.

Anyone who is caught in a rip current should always swim across the current – parallel to the beach, and not try to swim against the current.

“Keep a close eye on children and never let them swim alone,” the DCR said.

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