Border Patrol shows how they’re working to save lives
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Border Patrol shows how they’re working to save lives

According to border patrol officials in New Mexico, the Sunland Park area is the busiest and most heavily trafficked for undocumented migrants in the El Paso Sector.U.S. Customs & Border Protection allowed Hearst sister station, KOAT, to tour the border in a ride-along to showcase the dangers of crossing the border illegally.The ride-along started at 6 a.m. with CBP Agents Claudio Herrera & Refugio Corrales alongside Landon Hutchens, a CBP Public Affairs Officer.Our cameras captured the moment KOAT stepped foot in their unit, and we were immediately alerted to an apprehension. “Right now, they just apprehended three guys,” Corrales said as he drove the unit to the area where Border Patrol apprehended the group. As we get out of the car, we find agents detaining two men and two women, all from Honduras.They can clearly be seen as having been walking in the desert for several hours with no water. One of the migrants spoke to us on camera but asked her face not to be shown. “Sorry, I want to cry. It’s very hard when you’re a woman, you suffer a lot. I’m sorry. Days without eating. No sleep. Emotionally and physically some people have been left behind because they can’t keep walking anymore with kids. It’s so hard. I’m sorry,” said the female migrant as she held back tears. Excerpt taken from GoPro Camera During Ride-along:Reporter: How do you guys handle seeing this? Corrales: You just get used to it. I’ve been in law enforcement going on for 25 years. I’ve been on Border Patrol for 16 years. So I guess you get used to it. The only thing that bothers me is the little kids. That’s the only thing that bothers me.So far this month, CBP has been averaging 750 migrant encounters per day in the El Paso Sector — this includes legal and illegal crossings.Within the past week and a half, the agency has reported seven migrant deaths. The triple-digit heat was blamed for some of them. “That’s probably a factor in these deaths. But I mean, we have that every single year. These migrants don’t take that into consideration. Very little water, very little food. The terrain, I mean, makes it difficult for their journeys,” Corrales said. That journey is usually led by human smugglers, also known as “Coyotes.”A popular area for smugglers to hang out in is along the Anarpa Gap, an area where the border wall ends near Mt. Cristo Rey in Sunland Park.Excerpt taken from Q&A with CBP Agent Corrales and Reporter Andres Valle:Reporter: When you’re in this area, do you ever get attacked by these coyotes or smugglers?Corrales: Well, there are a lot of agents here in the sector that do get assaulted in this general area. We have had agents that get assaulted by rocks.Reporter: All for an American Dream?Corrales: All for an American dream, yes. And these smugglers really tell these people that it’s safe to come through here. And I mean you, you’ve seen the general area, and it’s not safe. It’s not easy to go through here.Migrants who are detained by CBP will be processed under Title 8 and may face immediate deportation with a five-year ban on entering the United States.

According to border patrol officials in New Mexico, the Sunland Park area is the busiest and most heavily trafficked for undocumented migrants in the El Paso Sector.

U.S. Customs & Border Protection allowed Hearst sister station, KOAT, to tour the border in a ride-along to showcase the dangers of crossing the border illegally.

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The ride-along started at 6 a.m. with CBP Agents Claudio Herrera & Refugio Corrales alongside Landon Hutchens, a CBP Public Affairs Officer.

Our cameras captured the moment KOAT stepped foot in their unit, and we were immediately alerted to an apprehension.

“Right now, they just apprehended three guys,” Corrales said as he drove the unit to the area where Border Patrol apprehended the group.

As we get out of the car, we find agents detaining two men and two women, all from Honduras.

They can clearly be seen as having been walking in the desert for several hours with no water.

One of the migrants spoke to us on camera but asked her face not to be shown.

“Sorry, I want to cry. It’s very hard when you’re a woman, you suffer a lot. I’m sorry. Days without eating. No sleep. Emotionally and physically some people have been left behind because they can’t keep walking anymore with kids. It’s so hard. I’m sorry,” said the female migrant as she held back tears.

Excerpt taken from GoPro Camera During Ride-along:

Reporter: How do you guys handle seeing this?

Corrales: You just get used to it. I’ve been in law enforcement going on for 25 years. I’ve been on Border Patrol for 16 years. So I guess you get used to it. The only thing that bothers me is the little kids. That’s the only thing that bothers me.

So far this month, CBP has been averaging 750 migrant encounters per day in the El Paso Sector — this includes legal and illegal crossings.

Within the past week and a half, the agency has reported seven migrant deaths. The triple-digit heat was blamed for some of them.

“That’s probably a factor in these deaths. But I mean, we have that every single year. These migrants don’t take that into consideration. Very little water, very little food. The terrain, I mean, makes it difficult for their journeys,” Corrales said.

That journey is usually led by human smugglers, also known as “Coyotes.”

A popular area for smugglers to hang out in is along the Anarpa Gap, an area where the border wall ends near Mt. Cristo Rey in Sunland Park.

Excerpt taken from Q&A with CBP Agent Corrales and Reporter Andres Valle:

Reporter: When you’re in this area, do you ever get attacked by these coyotes or smugglers?

Corrales: Well, there are a lot of agents here in the sector that do get assaulted in this general area. We have had agents that get assaulted by rocks.

Reporter: All for an American Dream?

Corrales: All for an American dream, yes. And these smugglers really tell these people that it’s safe to come through here. And I mean you, you’ve seen the general area, and it’s not safe. It’s not easy to go through here.

Migrants who are detained by CBP will be processed under Title 8 and may face immediate deportation with a five-year ban on entering the United States.

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